Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?

IN A PRETTY TYPICAL link-to-it-and-drop-an-Oscar-Wilde-bon-mot post on Instapundit, Glenn Reynolds refers to the condition detailed in the article here as “the sad economics of Internet fame.” Apparently, accepting and adapting to reality is now sad when whiney social justice types find the real condition to be — (whine) unfair.

Poor is the new rich, as Sarah Hoyt sagaciously notices.

I have said many times, many ways, in many venues over the years, in the future, we will all be cottage industrialists. People with facile-but-limited understanding of reality may call it the post-scarcity economy, but I prefer to think of it as the post-jobs economy. That is, to say not that we will no longer have to work for a living, but that we will no longer work for a single employer for an entire career, deriving our entire incomes at a single job at any given time. Rather, everyone who is prudent (or, maybe, the prudent and imprudent alike) will maintain several opportunistic income streams supported by a skill set generally more-varied than (I suspect) a lot of people these days are accustomed to thinking of as the norm.

You may find that sad; I don’t. Though it’s hard to persuade anyone of it, I see it as hopeful, and reflective of a greater level of opportunity available to those willing to work diligently at earning a living doing many things they enjoy — albeit none of which may be the sole support of an individual or a family.

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