OK. So the Glittering

HOO-HAHS* of the Science Fiction Writers of America (SFWA) have proven the truth of Conquest’s Second and Third Laws:

2. Any organization not explicitly right-wing sooner or later becomes left-wing.
3. The simplest way to explain the behavior of any bureaucratic organization is to assume that it is controlled by a cabal of its enemies.

(The first being, “Everyone is conservative about what he knows best.” And only semi-relevant to this post.)

They have, as a trade guild of authors supposedly active in a field dedicated to challenging conventional thinking, expelled one of their members for politically-incorrect utterances. (No idea what. Don’t care. Not relevant.)

Which should be just fine. Authors these days engaged in efforts to push back the frontiers of ignorance, to labor in the vineyards of the Literature of Ideas (–Harlan Ellison, if memory serves) are, if they’re serious about getting their work out there and making money at it, are independent self-publishers. As such, SFWA is — I don’t care — Not Relevant.

What? Me? Care?

* Coined by either Kate Paulk or Sarah Hoyt. Can’t remember which.

3 responses to “OK. So the Glittering

  1. Yes, Conquest is relevant here, as I wrote some time ago. However, equally relevant is Porretto’s Offhand Law:

    An organized group of any sort is a magnet for those who want power over others.

    After 61 years of “research,” I have yet to find a counterexample.

  2. Considering the history of SciFi in exploring the idea of nightmarish dystopian societies, it’s ironic that so many latter day SciFi authors would be supportive of the very stripe of government that will unleash those nightmare worlds upon us.

    Bastiges.

  3. Mark Philip Alger

    Rita;

    Sorry. I’m kinda surprised you didn’t already have approval. This must be your first comment on this new incarnation of the site. Didn’t intend to hold your post.

    There is that. But there’s also that so many of the giants of the Golden Age were of the school of H.G. Wells, who was a marxian progressive. Some of them grew out of it — e.g., Heinlein. Others did not. It is their heirs who having wormed their way into the institutions and hollowed them out, are now faced with the realization of their vision.

    It’s never pretty when a utopian is faced with the true face of his vision.

    M