Author Archives: Mark Philip Alger

We In the Right Need

TO STOP ASSERTING that leftist myrmidons, by their Alinskyite tactics, are alienating “half the country.” Admit it: the right is far MORE than half. We represent a majority view. An electoral majority, not an ethnic majority, although there’s that, too.

Ellipses 17 June 2017

THE CORNER AT NRO: David Frum used to be someone we in the Right listened to, at least. We tend to do that, the Left’s “You know nothing of other opinions because you live in an echo chamber” tu quoque notwithstanding. We tend to stop listening when they go all craphouse rat insane. Case in point…

No. The Second Amendment Is Not Given Special Treatment.

MEGAN FOX: Unhinged Rhetoric About ‘Nazis’ and Trump Derangement Syndrome Lead to Bloodshed I suspect that they will — someday — rue the day. But that day is not this day. Yet.

ACE: nor should they.

Ellipses: June 15, 2017

BACK IN THE OLD DAYS back when I had more to say about current events, I used to do this feature I called Ellipses — quick links and quotes, á Instapundit — in a bunch as line items, separated by ellipses (…). See if this works.

ROGER KIMBALL: Trump and the end of the beginning.

I particularly love this metaphor:

There is a small pen of chihuahuas yapping wildly that Trump should be impeached because, because, because—the doggies will get back to us later with a reason. (The real reason is simply that they don’t like Mr. Trump.)

Heh. The legacy partisan press as ankle-biters. Indeed.

FIRE: Rejecting the “heckler’s veto” That for those who say only the government can impose censorship. To which I say, “It’s spinach and to hell with it.” It is pernicious. It is illegitimate. It ought not be countenanced in a liberal society. And to Hell with it!

And that’s how they work. If this little snippet of an Ellipsis gets a decent reaction, I’ll try to do more. Back then, they were the feature I found easiest to do, and the rest of what I view as the golden-age BabyTrollBlog followed in their train. Readers from that period, who might miss it and desire a resurgence of that content, should do well to let me know.

An Embarrassment of Riches

IN THE MAIL AGAIN TODAY (Well, the mail brought something second day in a row, not the SAME thing.): Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology. It’s a gorgeous package, especially for a trade paperback. I hope it doesn’t suck. (Not that I expect it to.)

Lost Cities

IN THE MAIL Lost City of Stone: The Story of Nan Madol, the “Atlantis” of the Pacific by Bill S. Ballinger.

In working up the back story of my ficton — or, at least, of the generation of the Nineteenth Century — I have devised a plot — scarcely original, a Tarzanian tale of wiley, adventurous white Europeans stealing a priceless cultural treasure from hapless native dark people. And this done literally at the behest of a God. In this case: Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of Love. It centers around the natives of Ponape, the island location of Nan Madol, a mysterious Petra in the Caroline Islands. The book caught my imagination and is providing me background material about the city.

QOTD – 5 May 2017

Claiming total certainty about the science traduces the spirit of science and creates openings for doubt whenever a climate claim proves wrong. Demanding abrupt and expensive changes in public policy raises fair questions about ideological intentions. Censoriously asserting one’s moral superiority and treating skeptics as imbeciles and deplorables wins few converts.

–Bret Stephens, in THAT article in The New York Times, which I doubt those of you on the Left have even read, either in part or its entirety. And you should be ashamed of such intellectual dishonesty.

Better Nate than Lever

CONTINUING OUR LONG-STANDING tradition of missing our own landmark dates (e.g, Dolly’s birthday), I neglected to chime in yesterday on this blog’s fifteenth anniversary.

Obscure old-joke reference in title.

I’d claim having been in the throes of a nasty cold as an excuse, but nevertheless: mea culpa.

The Vacuity of Journos

CAN BE REVEALED in the stupidity of the cliches they use. E.G.: “Changed the course of history.” Every one of them uses it to describe epochal events. What does it mean? History is the record of major events. The course of history is set, because it happened in the past. You cannot — by definition — change the course of history while it’s happening. You can MAKE history, and most epochal events are history-making.

To change the course of history would be to alter the past. Or discover something new about the past that will have an altering effect on the record. Say: Hitler and Eva Braun were discovered in the bunker in flagrante hiding this fact was what drove Goebbels to drag their bodies out and burn them in the garden, or whatever. This is contrary to what is known or thought about the events of April, 1945, and would change history, though the events of that time have not changed, nor our understanding of them, so the course of history remains unchanged.

Observation 006: 13 March 2017

Afternoon cloudscape over Fairmount, Western Cincinnati, taken from the top deck of the Western Hills Viaduct, above the Mill Creek Valley.

Gorgeous Light

ON THURSDAY AFTERNOON Cell phone camera demonstrates its inadequacies. Not that I couldn’t have gotten what I saw using it, but that I couldn’t get it in a snapshot.

Taking time to set up a shot and work the meter to get the desired exposure is not something that’s easy to do when one is behind the wheel.

The Cincinnati Club at Fourth and Broadway. Layered in Photoshop and foreground and sky separated to allow for exposure adjustment.

The Cloud Observatory: Observation 005, 03-05-17

Works in Progress Update

JUST A QUICK NOTE to keep everybody up-to-date. #ThisIsThePlaceILovedHerMemoir is still in-progress, albeit stalled. As I said to J, although I know what’s next, I don’t feel moved to continue just now. I’m back to the first of the story-a-week challenge, the first of what I’m calling “The Further Adventures” of Dolly and Drummond. It’s been almost three weeks since I started it and It’s far from finished. I have two other starts, (including the HashTag and a third in an entirely other ficton). Progress being made in fits and starts on all. Also: working still on The Origin Protocols. No significant wordage down recently on anything. A lot of staring at blank and half-blank screens and — air quotes — “thinking”.

I’m Sure Most of You

WILL HAVE HEARD but just in case you haven’t. The Dear and priceless Connie du Toit has passed, leaving the world bereft of her scintillating presence. And her beloved Kim is now alone in life and reaches out via a renewal of his blogness at Splendid Isolation Go. Read. Register so you can comment. It will doubtless be a lively community and participation will only be possible via commentary.

Dolly and I will attempt to keep up, though I’m dead certain Kim will set a lively pace.

It’s Dolly’s Birthday!!!

EVEN WHEN I THINK about it in advance and plan for it, I tend to forget this central fact about my ficton: Gabrielle Francesca “Dolly” East made The Leap from a free-floating anima to a fully-integrated soul inhabiting a human body — in short, she was born — today 19 years ago, February 14, 1998.

Shortly thereafter, I wrote this novel, detailing the first twelve hours of Dolly’s life.

Check it out. Buy it, if you are so moved. Enjoy it. I am certain you will.

Happy Valentine’s Day. As Niel Finn of Crowded House put it: I don’t pretend to know what you want, but I offer love.

This Is The Place Update

THIS IS THE PLACE I LOVED HER — the memoir mentioned earlier, has progressed to 7500 words in (so far) 9 chapters. It’s a short book and will be a fast read. I expect it will also be a heart-wrencher. At least, bringing forth the memories requisite to writing it is proving to be so.

I am taking as my text for the sermon lyrics from Crowded House songs — at present mainly “She Goes On” but, almost inevitably, “Fall At Your Feet”, as the latter song has proven to be a literal script for what I should have said to her forty-four years ago.

Artful Living Announcement

I HAVE AN ANNOUNCEMNT to make — for all of you following along at home. I have two new stories starting up. One is a science fiction story that I’m trying to make unique and special, given it’s about an old-ish topic. The other is a literary memoir — which may prove the kiss of death for it — but I’m strongly moved by recent currents in my lifestream.

The Origin Protocols (Baby Troll Chronicles, Book Three) is still in process.

That’s all I had to say.

On Process

THOSE OF YOU WHO HAVE BEEN PAYING ATTENTION will have noticed that I am building in my Pinterest profile a series of boards full of pins containing reference images of stock decorative elements. The main board (the oldest one) is called Art Lessons. One of the more recent boards is Art Elements:

Many of the elements I’ve pinned there are oriented toward the design of ceramic tiles, about which I know a little (very little), having designed one.

In the fall of 2003, Sting’s Sacred Love album was released. And shortly thereafter, preparations began for a tour in support of the record. When long time Sting associate and tour manager Billy Francis contacted me to begin design work on the passes for the tour, he told me that Sting had played with a lot of diverse influences from around the world and wanted, as a theme, some Islamic influences. I immediately thought (though I didn’t say it then) of the line from Al Stewart’s “Year of the Cat”: By the blue-tiled wall near the market stalls/There’s a hidden door she leads you to./’These days,’ she says, ‘I feel my life/Just like a river running through/The Year of the Cat. The key point there being the “blue-tiled” bit. Moroccan tiles are famously blue. And intricate. And of wonderful workmanship. I don’t remember which one of us zeroed in on the ceramic tile design, but whoever it was, that became one of my focuses.

First, I found an image to be used as a reference. The image I found was perfect. It represented perfectly the tile I felt we were looking for. The only problem, as I remember it, was that the image was a photograph taken at an angle and the design wasn’t perfectly square and true, which meant, if I followed it exactly, my design would be all wibberty-jobberty. Not on. So I had to use it literally as a reference and NOT as a pattern. I had to figure out the size and proportions and the intervals, angles, and repeats geometrically. It wasn’t hard, but it was tedious.

Somewhere along in the process, I received in FedEx a DVD of photographs of Sting. The images were from a photographer (who works with Sting a lot) and had been heavily processed for use in the CD packaging for the Sacred Love album. Billy and I talked through ideas for the various pictures — this one to be used for the satin passes, that one for laminates, the third for signage and so-forth. We’ll do some post processing on one of them for the second leg and specials. (That may not have been the run of the actual conversations, but that’s how the process generally worked.) In the lot was a picture of Sting, barefoot, sitting on the floor with his back against a wall. The wall was in heavy shadow (The picture may appear in the CD package — I don’t recall.) I conceived the idea — harkening back to the “Year of the Cat” quote, of making a wall out of the tiles I was building — tilting them in perspective — and masking the figure of Sting to “float” above them so it looked like the wall he was leaning against was made of these beautiful Moroccan tiles of blue, white, and gold. Similar treatments in monochrome for the satin passes. (At the time we were still printing satin passes offset, not digitally, and so couldn’t print full-color except at great cost. Laminates were digital and so full-color, as well as being higher-value, so worthwhile doing something special (more on that in a bit).)

I worked the eventual pattern of the tile in CorelDRAW — giving myself the leeway to work the geometry in a vector application, which provided greater sharpness and precision to the design. Then I saved it out to Illustrator format which could be exchanged with Photoshop, where I had the ability to overlay color and lighting effects.

A fully-realized copy of the design, called startile with grout.

Although the image looks natural — and does more so in a smaller format and in perspective — it is wholly artificial. The geometric patterns are flat black-and-white. Each has an added color overlay and various shadowing and embossing or debossing to add the third dimension The white border is the “grout” to ensure that, in a step-and-repeat wallpaper pattern, there is a space between the tiles.

And, the “finished” product. Well, not completely. This is the base art, without type — which is added in CorelDRAW just before making up for printing. And I faked it. This isn’t the “real” image, but one I reproduced from memory. And, on the top-level laminate, issued to the inner circle of band, crew, staff, and management, the Sting logo script was stamped in gold leaf. I wish I could show the process of masking the image of Sting, and adding the shadow, but I no longer have access to those images, as they are the property of my former employer. Although, if you do a Google image search on Sting Sacred Love laminate, you’ll see a lot of other designs I did for this tour and other ones. (I never got the Sacred Love laminates onto my Pinterest board and, for some reason I can’t fathom, Otto has stopped displaying passes on their Web site. (CB: If you read this, can you shed some light on that?)

Throw Forward Wednesday: An Update

THE JOB I REFERRED COYLY TO the other week is no secret, I’ve just been coming to terms with it. It’s this simple: I’m driving for Lyft — the gig economy ride share service. In an interim progress report, it seems to be going well. I’m maintaining an acceptable-to-fair star rating and have a 100% acceptance rating (which probably means nothing to anyone not directly involved), and I’m making money. Not hand-over-fist, and not nearly $35/hour (though I can see how it’s possible). I can see how it can be a reasonable part-time job (I’m shooting to be on the road 36 hours a week), supplementing other income streams, or providing the mainstay of a diverse set of them.

The other day, Toni regaled me with some tales of her youth, spent in Detroit among a rich community of friends and family and a music scene that you have to see close up to realize how cool it would have been to be there.

Today, out doing my gig economy gig, I found myself taking a tour down memory lane, while listening to the nostalgia-inducing music of Crowded House on shuffle play on Spotify. I had a trip take me to the neighborhood that my high school crowd sometimes called Blonde Hill for the fact that my Jewish American Princess sweetheart lived there. After dropping off my rider, I tootled up the hill to what used to be her street. Just taking the turns at the stop signs, memories came flooding back. I followed the doglegs back to the cul de sac in front of her old house. There was another, similar one next to it that, somehow, I didn’t remember from back then. But I recognized the pattern of the windows on the front wall — the living room on the left, the kitchen on the right. The steep grade to the garage I don’t remember anybody ever using. They all parked on the street.

You have to picture all this to the sound track of Crowded House and a state of mind prone to fits of depressive nostalgia: she was the love of my life — the one who got away. She was entirely justified in leaving me, but, as Amanda Marshall put it, it broke me. I still feel it, but it was — also as the song goes — no-no-no-no-o body’s fault but mine. In a mood that grows out of Willie Nelson’s “To All the Girls I Loved Before,” I wonder whatever became of her. She’d be 61, now (she’s nine months younger than I). Is the petite girl who, on figure skates on Eden Park’s Mirror Lake, evoked Elton John’s Tiny Dancer for me still in there somewhere? God how I’ve missed her!

Then, a few moments later, I found myself again translated to another of my old stomping grounds — this time the University of Cincinnati area, called Clifton, and the various places I lived there in my early 20s, from leaving High School and hanging out in a co-op house near the Zoo, through my first solo apartment, the job at the Palace Theater, and starting out at Otto, on through until Toni and I, recently married, moved out of our expensive apartment on the other side of the hill to a house in a tonier ZIP code with a cheaper monthly mortgage payment.

Looking at this post, with its lack of a real conclusion, I suspect that the new job will be the source of other posts. I hope they will be entertaining. More-so than the one below, which finally explains from my perspective, what became of the greatest gig in the world and my mysterious departure from it.

“I Still Cry In the Night” — How I Torpedoed My Career

AND THREW AWAY THE DREAM JOB OF A LIFETIME in two or three keystrokes. It was really that simple.

Lawyers and others who deal in confidences place these mouse-type disclaimers at the bottoms of their emails (one assumes by default) to the effect of “This is privileged communication. If you’re reading it and not the intended addressee, stop, and discard the email. Notify the sender.” And such-like. Over the years, I had thought maybe we at Otto should have such a disclaimer on our stuff, but never did anything about it. It probably wouldn’t have helped me in my terminal situation, but I might have had at worst one leg to stand on, instead of having them both cut out from under me.

In the middle of a work week last December, I was, among my other tasks and duties, engaged in an exchange of emails with a person who was very thoroughly playing the asshole. They were jerking my chain and generally revealing themselves to be someone with whom I would never have a comfortable relationship. There have been others like that down the years. You meet lots of them in life … But this person was an unique specimen of the breed.

Watching a documentary on Netflix over the weekend: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers — Running Down a Dream, I found myself nodding in agreement with Benmont Tench (at least I think he was the one who said this), relating of a time he found himself disillusioned with the music business — how sleazy it is and how many slimey and corrupt, individuals — how many malignant narcissists — there are in it… and then allowing that he came to the realization that most business, indeed most of life, is like that and the music business is hardly unique in that way.

Well, moving along, I was begging to be relieved of the burden of dealing with this particular individual. But it’s matter of policy (one I myself can lay claim to, as a matter of fact) that we didn’t say, “No.” That there was always a way we would try to meet a prospective customer’s needs or demands, no matter how unreasonable they might seem. And, as it had been my prospecting efforts which had brought this person to light, I was kinda stuck with them. Nevertheless, I bitched. And there were sympathetic ears in the office for me to bitch to, as it was agreed that, good customer service aside, this person was pushing the outside of the envelope.

One morning, I found a message from them in my InBox. It was insulting in the extreme, full-on unearned condescension and a good deal of malign spew. I probably would have been justified in simply ignoring it. And, if I had, you probably would not be reading this sad tale. I forwarded it to one of those sympathetic ears with a note asserting that it was not our place as a business to tell a customer not to behave like that, but…

At least, I thought I did.

Turned out that, instead of hitting Alt-W to forward the message, I must have hit Alt-R to reply, because it seems my little mini rant, couched in terms virtually guaranteed to inflame your garden variety malignant narcissist, was actually sent to the person in question. I called a spade a spade, making no bones about it, albeit laying out said calling in a way that was not truly actionable. I didn’t say, “You, (sir or madam) are a douchebag,” I said, “It’s not our place to tell people not to behave like a douchebag.” Nevertheless, they threatened to sue if I weren’t fired. I’m at all not certain how libel can be shown to be the case in a private communication, but … whatever. My defense, pretty lame as it was was that I had not intended the message for the individual, but for my coworker, and, in my view, they had improperly intercepted a privileged communication. But I was quickly persuaded that wouldn’t fly. Although the matter clearly was not actionable, the mere bringing of a suit and the cost of defending it could prove ruinous, so, I had to — so to speak — lean in and take one for the team.

Of course, it would have been nice if my employers had said, “Scroom. You’ve been a loyal employee for 35 years and nobody dictates our personnel policy — NO BODY.” But it’s business and they didn’t. In fact, they couldn’t get me out the door fast enough.

None of which is the point of this plaint. After a tearful goodbye to my work wife, I cleared out my desk, changed what passwords I reasonably could, and handed over the rest, and rode the elevator down and out of the world that had been my life for 35 years, spanning five decades, three cities in two states, my marriage, and all the rest.

Last fall, a video crew from Kentucky Educational Television had been shooting in the loft and, in a conversational moment, I asserted to the producer/reporter that “Most of what’s on the walls here (framed passes and RIAA platinum disc awards) is mine.” In the course of my exit, my work wife repeated that back to me. I hadn’t even realized she’d heard me. How could 35 years of a life simply be thrown on the scrap heap like that? I still cry in the night.

Tonight I lay awake, thinking about it — running over the sound track of the aforementioned documentary in my mind — and wondered how many, of all the hundreds and thousands of people I’ve met and worked with over the years even know I’m gone? How many, when they find out, will even care? Will any of them miss me — miss the things I did for them? Over the years, I’ve tried to teach the front line folk that their job is first and foremost to be the customer’s advocate. Will that ethos survive in a bottom-line kind of atmosphere?

I think, in the intervening months, I’ve heard from two of my former clients: one the touring director for a top country act, the other the tour manager for a Mexican folk singer. Both I have known since the early eighties. I’m still active on LinkedIn and Facebook. You’d think SOMEbody would write or call to ask, “What happened to you?” But: crickets. I sometimes wonder if the person who got me fired (Do they know they ruined my life?) is glad of their kill and wears my figurative scalp on their belt with pride.

I guess it’s true, what Orwell said. In a time of universal deceit, truth-telling may be seen as a revolutionary (or criminal) act. Be careful who you tell the truth to. They may not like hearing it.

Blogroll Change of Note

AUTHOR MARKO KLOOS formerly of the Munchkin Wrangler blog and Tam’s comment threads fame, and recently, here, of MilSF authorship fame, has moved or is moving his principal venue to a new URL: markokloos.com. We have adjusted our blogroll to suit. So should you.

It should be noted that this change happened back in May, so we are — as per usual — behind the curve and there is a blue ton of good stuff already there, and Marko moved the MW archives over, (something I should do here, when I can get a round tuit) so don’t be afraid to dive right in.

As the Weather Toughens Up

AND, INDEED, THEY ARE evacuating Gatlinburg due to fires we hope a rain storm juiced by a hurricane in the Gulf might lay down enough precipitation to abate the fires some, I am once again thinking about art and possibly revamping the cover styles for the Baby Troll Chronicles series.

Bearing in mind that a cover design has to sell the book, not describe it, I find myself drawn to 19th Century advertising posters designed and illustrated by Czech artist, Alphonse Mucha, whom I have typed as the heart and soul of the Art Nouveau movement. I’m a major fan of art nouveau for the romantic feel of it and the crafsmanship that it requires — unlike the BS poseur-ism of modern and post modern — scorn quotes — “art.” That plus that I, being lazy, can essentially “steal” (in Picasso’s terms) virtually whole designs and yet score points for a practical level of “originality”. The image at right could be a romanticized rendition of Drummond and Dolly in hot-and-heavy clinch all while ticking each and every box to sell the book.

It’s right down the line with how, over my career at Otto, I would teach myself a particular style of commercial art — Peter Max, Punk rock album cover, San Francisco Art Nouveau, what-have-you — and rip off its jargon and vernacular for my projects. Of course, your ordinary backstage pass project doesn’t call for or allow the kind of depth and extent that a real ripoff requires, so the touch has to be light, and actually, barely recognizable as being such. (Sort of qualifies as Heinlein’s filing off the serial numbers.)

For these book covers, I’m going to study and appropriate art nouveau — and, along the way, generate a large amount of collateral. I’ll be starting in two places at once — first, the general layout and framing techniques and, second, the fine-detail illustration techniques and motifs. The finish will be the main figures to fill the frames, showing the characters. Then we’ll throw type over the top: our title and credits. Each title — by the time we’re done with this first lot, there’ll be three — will be covered in 3 formats, hardback, trade paperback, and eback. We may not be able to publish hard cover with the resources available to indies right now. But someday — one hopes someday soon — we will. No sense in doing all the work now only to have to do it all over down the road. Have it ready now and, when the opportunity knocks, you’ll be ready.

I only started the raw layout sketches today, so it’ll be a slow-ish process. But I’ll be posting every day or two with progress reports. I hope.

In My Early Teens, Despite Never Having Been…

OUT TO SEA, OR EVEN out on water in anything more substantial than a car ferry, I designed a sailboat. Which, to my delight, my nautically-inclined leatherneck uncle pronounced a fair-looking craft. He even thought it would float.

In world building my ficton for the Baby Troll Chronicles, I’ve included in my back story a character who is partly attached to the modern stories of the adventures of Gabrielle “Dolly” East, her karmic predecessor, Gabrielle Francesca East, called the most successful Childe of the East in the long history of Upothesa, who held that office from 1838 to 1863 and founded East College of the Americas, which is the main venue for most of the stories.

During her tenure, GFE1, as I call her for short, served for a time as the chief factor of the commercial enterprises of the Greek God Hephaestus — Olympia Trading, Ltd. As such, she was required to travel the world at some length (indeed, spending all of her 20s at sea, participating in such various historical events as the founding of Hong Kong and the Crimean War). Her vehicle for these travels is an iconic sailing vessel, which I have early on typed as a sloop and christened Bella Donna (Italian, meaning Beautiful Lady). The choice of sloop seemed appropriate at first, as it could be crewed by a small complement, but would be seaworthy for long voyages, given opportunities and resources for resupply.

Here recently, I’ve been exercising my love of sailing ships and conning them across the open water by gathering images of tall ships on a Pinterest board I’ve called Tall Ships, Blue Water. Along with that, I’ve been reading about sailing vessels — renewing my acquaintance with the types. And I’ve come to think that the sloop is not so much the appropriate type for Bella Donna, the first Gabrielle Francesca’s yacht and have settled, perhaps, on a schooner, such as The Lady Washington (left below) or The Pride of Baltimore (right), although a three-masted, ketch-rigged, fore-and-aft, topsail schooner would fit the bill completely, which takes us into the realm more of a brig or a brigantine.

As I take up my pencil and pens to re-up my drafting chops, I find myself eager to try drawing a sailing vessel of some type, albeit not one so complex and sophisticated as those above. Wish me success, please.

For some reason, the embed code for the pins of the ship images above is problematic. If you can’t see the thumbnails and want to see the full images, click on the box(es) to be taken to the Pinterest board in question. There’s a wealth of reading on the subject at Wikipedia, and, being as the subject is not one where opinions are as heated as, say, whether or not Hillary Clinton is a double-damned dirty traitor or Donald Trump is a money-grubbing parvenu, most of the articles may be trusted as relatively accurate.

Bryce-ing Weather and the Art Thing

BEHIND THE SCENES HERE AT Casa d’Alger, it’s been a busy summer. Mostly because of me hustling to earn some money, but also because of me working to improve my art. And recover lost skills. Just wanted to surface for a minute, here, and post a couple of examples of what I’ve been doing. This is a rendering from Bryce.

first_render_160924

Bryce, for the uninitiated is an application that’s about 20 years old or so. It was developed by Kai Krause of Kai’s Power Tools fame and is made to build landscapes and scenes of places — like gardens and yards and houses, and suchlike. It sees a lot of use in game development and fantasy illustration. And book covers, which is why I’m using it. I used to use it extensively at Otto, but have fallen out of practice. Here’s a design I did for the Moody Blues back around the turn of the millennium using Bryce and a couple of other apps — Raydream Designer and Photoshop for the most part. In the way things develop, it’s a fairly crude illustration. I can conceive far more sophisticated images, now, but this, in its day was fairly complex and hard to do.

My intention, here, is to work toward several possible interior and exterior scenes that might be candidates for cover art, with the addition of character figures inserted in post. But, there being many a slip twixt cup and lip, things may change between now and then. We’ll see.

Not Wanting to Beat a Dead Horse

I HAVE BEEN PRETTY QUIET on the issue of global warming. As I have said ad nauseam, in order for the conjecture to prove worthy — indeed — of even the most cursory investigation, (let alone the full-court-press for terraforming the greens are mounting) it must demonstrate at least a reasonableness to the four legs of the stool.

In order for global warming to be worth anything other than maximum derision, it must be demonstrated, first, that the phenomenon exists at all — that there is, indeed, warming. Second, there must be a reasonable probability that the phenomenon is truly global in scope. Third, it must be demonstrated to be man-caused. And fourth, it must be shown to a reasonable degree of likelihood that the effects will be harmful and on a scale which outweighs the cost of potential remediation. In short, it must be demonstrated that the whole thing is Catastrophic, Anthropogenic, Global, Warming. If any one of the legs fails, the whole falls apart.

I have rehearsed here all the reasons why, far from only one, ALL FOUR of the legs fail — and abysmally so.

It appears I may have oversimplified the case. Dr. Ira Glickstein has posted at Watt’s Up With That? what looks to me on the merits very much like a dispositive takedown of CAGW, not only on the merits of the conjecture, but even on those of the proposed solutions.

I think it’s pretty clear that it may be taken that anyone who still “believes” global warming is a serious issue is someone who is barely able to count to twenty with his shoes on — if that — and needs to wear padded garments when let out of the house.

Print That Out And I’ll Chop It

IN A DISCUSSION AMONG WRITERS and fans on another blog, the notion of a chop — a stamp or seal used to sign and sanctify a document — for authors, the idea being to allow said author to sign more autographs and/or books in a shorter period of time.

Reading the various comments, it came to mind that I have used the concept in the past myself — signing work with a winged capital “A”, as can be seen in this frame from my orphaned comic strip, Jazzcat.

And that I might want to play with the notion of trying it again — to update the idea from forty years ago to the 21st Century. An image I had seen recently — an illustration by an asian woman, the provenance of which I can’t recall any more — put me in mind of a certain style of sig or logo that is, indeed, derivative of Chinese chop seals. examples of which can be seen on this Pinterest board (which I am now following). Designs like those seen can be rendered onto a custom made rubber stamp or, at greater expense, a formal chop-type seal. I do not have the facility with either the Chinese language or the system of writing to design my own of either, though, sometime in the future, given an improved pecuniary circumstance, if I can form a favorite aphorism to thus encode, I might have one made for myself. Meantimes, I tried my hand at a sort of a roundeyes version of the idea.

chop_malger_base_160628If you google “artists’ signatures”, you’ll find page after page of images of things like the Chinese chops and seals. And, in a lot of cases, the designs take advantage of the resemblance of geometric primitives — circles, squares, triangles, etc — to some arcane alphabet. I decided to take that as a jumping off point, using my initials — MPA — as the input filter. The result, as you can see, looks like the back of an envelope — which is kind of meta, if you think about it.

The image I’ve been carrying in my mind is, as best I can remember it, in two colors — black and red, with the design and characters reversed out to the (white) paper color. So I played with the basic logo to make several variations, but not wanting to get too far from something that, in the absence of a stamp or seal, could be drawn with a few quick strokes of a pen. The results below. (Click to embiggen.)

chop_malger_1_variations_160628.

Of course, given a Photoshop install (which I don’t have at the moment — the subscription for PSCC being beyond my reach*), one could readily spin off a wide variation with textures, embossing, shadows, glows, and lens flare, though you’d want to keep it simple. Either you can use a rubber stamp — which you can get custom-made for a reasonable fee — or you want to draw the chop by hand. If you get to the point where you have to use a 4-color, die-cut sticker, the idea of simplifying the autograph process has just jumped the shark.

*Though, it could be made possible were person or persons among the readership here moved to make contributions to the as-yet-ongoing GoFundMe campaign (button at right). Such would also serve the purpose of kick-starting my freelance art business, which is, at this moment (see posts below), stillborn.

For a Little Political Moment

IN THE MORNING… I heard someone yesterday objecting to Ted Cruz (at least I think the intent was objection) on the basis that “he thinks everybody in America should start their day on their knees in prayer.” My response: “Not a bad idea.” The conversation turned there to matters not germane to this post, so we will leave it.

I can hear a lot of my atheist friends objecting on a First Amendment basis, which I, frankly, consider balderdash. The Amendment commands, first: “Congress shall make no law.” Which places no limit on anyone else, anywhere else in this great and vast nation, and is utterly silent on the matter of mere suggestions from public officials or private citizens. (It should be pointed out that, constitutionally, Congress is the sole legislative authority at the Federal level (and ONLY the Federal level — setting aside the so-called supremacy principle for the nonce), a principle which, these days, is honored more in the breach with every Thomas E., Tricky Dick, and Harry S. issuing orders, regulations, and ukases right, left, center, fore, and aft.) and no other pronouncement may have the force of law, so … what’s the bother?

The First Amendment (and requirements within the Articles) are said to demand a wall of separation between Church and State. Which is a silly notion, since we have no Church for there to be a wall between it and the State (which has gotten entirely too big for its britches anyway) — big-“C” as in The Church — in America, (that pesky no-establishment thing), only a bunch of little-“c” churches. Yet, by demanding said wall, the anti-theists, in effect, establish their own church.

For it seems that the semi-(NGO-style)-official High Church of America has, by default become the New and Reform Church of Christ Anti-theist, or so the anti-theists would have us believe, claiming the Founders were “deists” who, having worshiped in Presbyterian, Baptist, Methodist, and even Catholic churches for nigh on two hundred years, didn’t ascribe to Christianity. Such is the anti-theist Big Lie, which, having been repeated often and loudly for decades, now, is close to becoming Received Truth, though We the (little) People seem to be resisting the notion somewhat of late.

Lest my atheist friends be offended (such offense not being my purpose here), I should state my opinion, which it seems is close to observable fact, that while atheism is simply another strain of religious belief, which is to be greeted with a shrug and a “suit yourself” by Americans everywhere, ANTI-theism, the toxic strain which seeks to breach the OTHER part of the First Amendment — the part which demands Congress make no law respecting the free exercise of religion — is, in effect, an offense against individual rights: simple bigotry, not to be tolerated.

So, when a man of faith is open about it, rather than concealing his intent by obfuscation, persiflage, and outright lies, and makes a suggestion which is, on the face of it, utterly harmless, and may even redound in a net good to the country as a whole, one has to ask those objectors (in tones Christians must get tired of hearing in response to objections to moral decay in the country), “What are you so upset about?”

Artsy Fartsy Living

SO I’M SITTING HERE THINKING Photography’s an art, innit? Right?

There was a big controversy about that back when I was a boy photographer back in the ’60s. They said, “Anybody can TAKE a picture.” (Implying, of course, that there’s not much art in that.)

Of course, as the true photographers knew all along, you don’t so much TAKE a picture, as you MAKE a picture. Even were it possible to capture a scene exactly as it is in a given instant, the next instant, it will change — subtly or in gross. And, in photographing the scene, you influence its appearance, as well as the quantum existence of its constituents.

Plus, a photograph prevents you from actually knowing a given scene. There’s the NCIS example, when di Nozzo explained to Kate why they still sketch crime scenes. Others, I’m certain, abound. Even I knew all that back then. It concludeth to say that there is more artifice in a photograph than not.

In my HS days, though, my specialty was candid portraits. Even on the yearbook staff, it was an acknowledged specialty. And I took my text from Henri Cartier-Bresson**, who was famous for his fly-on-the-wall mode of getting images. I even carried a black camera, as inspired by HC-B.

(And, funnily enough, I look up at the camera hanging by its strap off the baker’s rack I use for a desk and — sure enough — I’m still carrying a black Nikon.)

And the shots of mine that made it into the book(s) the years I was on the staff were candid. Though I suspect I wasn’t all that unobtrusive. Sitting in a high school classroom, ignoring the teacher, snapping away, shooting endless rolls of Tri-X, candid shots of self-conscious teenagers: hard to avoid being noticed. And being a 6-foot-plus hulk, (albeit pretty skinny back then), dressed in dark colors, with that big old camera stuck up to my eye all the time.

malger selfie 160422earnie_in_window_lightBut that’s still my style, making candid portraits of the world around me. Nowadays with digital cameras — in the phone, yet (What’ll they think of next!?), it’s easier to capture what you see, though sometimes, it’s still a tough job to get what you see in the frame. Even in a mirror. Not gonna state it as a rule, but it does seem to me as though you can’t get a camera in a position to where you can photograph yourself as you see you in a mirror. The perspective is always wrong — the shapes of objects are distorted subtly. Here, I was looking at the image in the mirror, but the image is looking at the screen on the phone, thus lidding the eyes, it being impossible to look two directions at once.

Serendipity plays a pivotal role in instantaneous art — that is art over which the artist has only when-to-push-the-button control over when to freeze the motion that is an inevitable component of any scene — even the stillest of still lives. In the fast-moving art of candid photography, even the most carefully-framed shot will reveal the unexpected — which can often be seen as a bonus.

serendipity_illustration_btb_160424jane looks upFor example: in the images to the right, the top shot is the intended frame. I was trying to get a picture of Loki. Jane just photobombed me. But Loki moved too fast for the shutter to “freeze” him in action, thus making him too blurry for a normally acceptable shot. (I say normally, because I’ve had blurry shots turn out cool enough to use for some purpose, but it’s not common.) But The image of Jane, when framed and cropped correctly, is of interest. So it is treated so and saved as one of “my” pictures.

**The link goes to a Wikipedia article about Henri Cartier-Bresson. For the love of God, if you have the slightest interest in art or fine-art photography, go and read the article. Follow the links. Buy the books — especially Cartier-Bresson’s The Decisive Moment.

Yet Another Art-a-Day Post

TWO WEEKS LATER. In fact, it’s been so long, with the interim so eventful, I barely recall the subject matter alluded to in the March 29 post. However, today, I have a different subject to relate to you.

Part of my take — right or wrong — on this exercise is that we participants ought to present current works IN PROGRESS. A sort of a semi-formalized What I Did Today. Being a procrastinator, I’m going to lag that a bit. But I think I have an excuse. I was up until 3AM fighting with the machinery and software to transfer photos from my phone to my computer. (If anybody knows a transfer utility superior to Air Droid, please enlighten me. For me, it keeps losing the WiFi connection and failing of transfer. The photo set for today’s post totals out at 43MB. I’ve no idea why, even at WiFi speeds, that should take long enough to time out.) So my post TODAY is about what I did YESTERDAY. For what I did TODAY, tune in TOMORROW. (Or maybe later, depending on how well I can keep to this schedule. Past performance being a reliable indicator of future results. (Or however that goes.))

20160412_171354Swennyway. What I did yesterday was build a shelf. For my wife Toni (whose birthday was Monday, BTW) to go on the exposed brick chimney above her desk in the Study at Casa d’Alger. So, as a spoiler, here’s what it looks like, now finished. Process shots next. (Click to embiggen. Click all the little pictures if you want to see them bigger.)

The whole thing stems from when Toni started collecting things VW. Well, no, I suspect it goes back to the eighties when we collected Lladro porcelain figurines. We have a large stock of cats, flappers … I think there’s a ship under sail in there. Birds, bunnies, rocks, ashtrays (not so many of those since both of us quit smoking). Tux, the Linux penguin. A rubber duckie. Mugs and mugs full of pencils and markers. And, here lately, Toni’s been developing quite the garageful of bugs and buses. And neat, framed art — photos and prints.

It’s started to get a bit crowded over there. So Toni started looking for corbels. I was picturing a pair of nice acanthus leaves, or an owl or a gargoyle. But she ended up with some nice, Shaker-esque brackets. Seven inches tall by five deep. With dadoes cut top and back and screw eyes mounted in the dadoes.

Left Corbel20160412_174719Meantime, let us consider the field. As you can see in the pic above (and the left and right ends, herewith), there is casing molding either side of the brick, covering the seam between the brick and the drywall. Og and I selected this and the dentil molding that runs around the ceiling line of the whole room (or will once it’s done). It’s triple-fluted, so the placement of the corbels is critical. It would have been nicer if they had been the same width as the molding, but you do with what you have. The downside of this is that it becomes obvious that the two pieces — the molding board and the corbel — were not made to go together. If they had, either there would be a table cut into the molding to bed the corbel or the flutes would have been stopped short of the corbel’s position. However, simply mounting the corbel on the molding, with the flutes continuing under it doesn’t look THAT bad. And the upside is that there is a well-centered trough in which to position the mounting screw, which makes the mounting easier.

Before mounting the corbels, I set a six-foot level across the space and drew a line on the moldings to serve as a guide to everything. Then I measured the corbels to make sure I was setting the screws in the right place to position the tops level to each other and the base line. Good thing I did that. On one, the keyhole for the mounting screw was centered 1316” down on the other, the drop was 1¾”. I also noticed to my chagrin that the manufacturer had neglected to include a bracket for the shelf in the top dado. Seemed a rather dumb design decision to me, but, hey — they’re selling, so it must work for them. I’ll never buy another anything from that manufacturer and I doubt they’ll miss me.

Having marked the drops, I set the screws and drove them in with the drill, leaving the heads proud (and testing with the brackets periodically, adjusting with a hand screwdriver). I take a moment to note here that the idiot teenager who designed these things specified flat head screws, rather than the application appropriate round or pan head (with or without washer).

20160412_165438Then the action moved outside with a collection of tools and a six-foot number one grade white pine one by six bought previously. I cut it to length. (Love my Diablo blade — a quick spritz of WD40 on the running blade helps fora cleaner cut and helps keep the blade clean.) 57 inches was our rough measurement to determine needed stock, but the actual length turned out to be 56¾”

20160412_165555Once cut to length, I wanted to chamfer the top edges on three sides (not the side against the wall. My router is a Bosch 2¼ HP beast that weighs a ton but is suprisingly easy to handle and quite nimble on the wood. It handles like a dream when its running. The spinning motor has enough mass to have a gyroscope effect, making the thing tend to want to stay steady. I pulled it out of storage for this project and was surprised when I opened the case to find that I’d put it away with the chamfer bit already locked up and height adjusted to a cut depth appropriate for a ¾” board. It was the work of a couple of minutes to finish the edges.

We’d agreed not to put any kind of sealant or finish on the shelf because of Ditto. Birds don’t take well to the volatile organic compounds that are outgassed from paints and varnishes, not to mention solvents, so you don’t use them in areas where birds are — or even nearby. (And that includes deodorizers.) So the final step in building this shelf was to sand it smooth and clean — free of blemishes and splinters. Not too hard, since I’d started out with white wood to begin with. I put a quarter-sheet of 320 grit sandpaper in my Bosch orbital pad sander — another power tool that’s a dream to use — and smoothed the face and edges, softening the corners as I went. I spotted and smoothed one place where the router had chattered a bit and missed another one. I bet nobody else will ever see it.

Next time, a pretty jewel of a piece.

The Artfully Living Post: 3/29/16

THE EAGLE SHITS TODAY by which I mean, Amazon royalty payments to authors who have elected to receive via direct deposit will drop today — according to what Amazon has sent out. My take: big whoop. If only my books were selling better, I might muster more enthusiasm. Still and all, I must be grateful for every fan. To do otherwise is declasse.

And, one should also keep in mind that the reason we are here on this mission is with the hope that, by enhancing my illustrating skills, I might improve the interesting-ness (is so a word) of my covers and improve my sales. So. To our muttons. (Add media.)

20160328_181957 As the school-days poem goes, I meant to do my work today. I spent a good deal of time gathering links to matter relevant and illustrations of principles great and small, but ran out of time (and energy) before I got to actually putting pencil to paper to draw the intended art for today. (Remember? We’re posting a work a day? That one.)

But… When I pulled out my pad of drawing bristol, I found the bit of visual doggerel at right tucked in behind the cover. It is a beginning exercise from a drawing lesson I never completed. For my usual reason — impatience. And therein lieth a lesson. I have little patience to wait (or work) for results. I want to achieve what I see in my mind’s eye right away. So, because so much comes so easily to me that I’ve come to expect it, it is harder for me than it ought to be to learn some subjects that require that I apply myself diligently. The exercise at hand is one that requires long practice and rigid control. Because the artist needs to lay down line after line after line of graphite so closely and evenly spaced that the resulting field appears to be a continuous swatch of a single color — or shade of gray. And, I think you can tell from the drawing of Ms. Easton in yesterday’s post I have little patience for finicky details. And when you say it like that, I think to myself that I really ought to grow up and buckle down to work instead of wanting it all RIGHT NOW. I do that a lot — have to remind myself to adult. Adultin’s hard doncha know. The technique is called the 5 Pencil Method and is espoused by Darrel Tank. You could do worse. If your results are a tenth of what Tank achieves, you’ll do well.

Tomorrow — I won’t promised, because I’ve learned better than to make promises I may not keep — or the next post, anyway, I do promise to get onto the choice of a face shape for a character under design. See you then.

Arting Livefully

MY YOUNGER FRIEND, CEDAR is undertaking to post a piece of art — no matter how trivial-seeming — every day for a year. I have seized on this notion as being a way to boot myself in the butt and get some serious time in on the drawing board.

I have just recently set up a work space in a corner of the office at Casa d’Alger — catty-corner from the bird’s cage, though not out of earshot of him when he gets all wound up (he’s self-winding) and starts in on the ear-splitting shrieks. The intent is that, now having a place to work, I will take advantage of any opportunity. But, I have found over my career in the field that opportunity never fails to take advantage of the opportunity to slip away, so that opportunity must be paired with a requirement for work to be done in order to permit progress. So the formula for self-employement needs to look something like this: opportunity to work plus work to be done over a deadline equals project. Having a project implies explicitly (or, as Dolly would put it: explies) the will to work or the desire.

The situation is far from ideal, so my perfectionism (the cynical or snarktastic individual will call it OCD) will niggle at me until I get the object of my desire

…A five-foot drawing table from Ikea on a tilt-and-height-adjustable trestle base. It’s not expensive for what it is, but I have no money right now and no income (but I do have a method for accepting donations — click the Go Fund Me link at right — hint-hint), so even the $150 for that table (most pro-level drawing tables run in the $500 range) is out of reach.

My present table is a piece of 1/2″ cheap-assed Chinese “hardwood” ply with a 1×2 stretcher glued to the bottom and clamped into the jaws of a Black&Decker Workmate. If you’re not used to working on a drawing table, this may not hit you right off, but those who have will get it immediately: the biggest drawback to this arrangement is that the work surface is flat. Level. Like a table.

And, that it’s not dedicated solely to arting means that I’ll have to take it down when I want to use the Workmate for something else — like building a shelf for SWMBO, which is coming up this week.

Which brings us back to the topic at hand — making excuses. (Sorry if your head got whipped around by that sudden change in direction, but there have been hints.)

I’m going to try the same thing: post a piece of art every day. I hope not to be so long-winded every time as I have been here. As my goal — the project, which is necessary to the demand for work-to-be-done, is to improve the covers of the Dolly stories (again, sorry for the sudden tangent) — my first task, or sub-project, is to devise a character design of Dolly. Which means drawing — first with pencil, then in pen and ink, with color following on — of a human face and figure, from the skin out. I will be following self-assigned lessons.

My preferred text, Giovanni Civardi’s Complete Guide to Drawing has a whole section on drawing the human figure, heads and faces, hands, and so-forth, but is primarily aimed at classical fine art technique, and what I’m after is a more modern, comic style (comic book, manga, anime), so I will be drawing (pun intended) lessons from elsewhere. For the last year or so, I have been gathering images and articles from around the Web to a Pinterest Board, called Art Lessons There are around 700 pins on the board right now, and I am constantly adding more on an ongoing basis, so you may imagine that most of them are not relevant to the topic at hand. Nor are the lessons on “how to draw” (although Civardi’s does touch on technique), as it’s assumed that the student will already have a modicum of eye-hand coordination to make him able to draw what he sees. (There, though, the main trick is in the seeing — I know you’re tired of hearing that, but until you “get” it, it’s going to keep being repeated. And then you’ll get it and start preaching it yourself.)

And, now, to the nut of things. I can imaging that those of you who have been following along at home are scratching your little wooden heads and asking: “This guy claims to have been a professional for an entire career; why is he starting with the basics?” Good question. Here’s a dirty little secret: commercial artists don’t do much art. That is, to say, that what an artist does is art by definition, and therefor, what commercial artists do is to be considered art, but what we-they-I do/did wasn’t what a lot of people consider art. That is, to say, I didn’t really draw or paint on a daily basis and have never made any sculpture. And, truth be told, very few of the images I used in my designs were of my own original creation. And, I suspect, that, up to a certain level, this is universally true of all production commercial designers. We manipulate images and do so according to accepted design standards, and to technical specifications, but there’s only so much “art” (pron: “aht”) in it.

sheena_easton_drawingWhat art there is is more like this: a picture of the Scottish singer, Sheena Easton. It is essentially a tracing (it could be a copy, I don’t really remember) from a photograph. In processing terms, it would have been a CMYK separation from a printed piece (a CD longbox), which would have to be scanned in what was then known as a “copydot and rescreen” process in order to be actually used, but which would have potentially added several thousand dollars to the product cost. So, if memory serves, we never used the photograph, but only logos and type to produce the work for the tour. So the image is “orphaned.” It is work product and the image it references was never used by us.

And, as the drawing — not the scan, which is fresh today — is from sometime around 1990 (Wikipedia says the album — What Comes Naturally — was released in 1991, which sounds about right.) Which makes it a quarter-century old, and could be the last time I drew an image with my own hand, as Otto was in the process of going digital for art and prepress even then, so the rest of my output from then to last December was done on a computer. Which means that I haven’t drawn in twenty-five or so years. And, like any motor skill, drawing ability can deteriorate over time if not used. So, if I want to make the illustrations for my own covers, and not be held captive by the availability and price of others, and be permitted the liberty of making any image I can imagine and execute, and not having to rely on modifying stock photos, I need to be able to draw the human figure.

That’s why.

Word Press is reporting over 1200 words so far, so I’m going to cut this short and continue tomorrow. I intend my first efforts to be the exploration of the shapes of female faces. There are a whole bunch of charts of heads of manga/anime/comic characters in the Art Lessons boards. If you want to read ahead (that’s how you spot the ambitious ones), feel free. Until then, then.

The Cloud Observatory: Observation 004/0316

Playing with a processing module of Google’s Nik Collection.

CloudObs_afxp2_160326

My take on this after one session is that the user would be better served were it unified with an over-arching interface. (In fairness, it’s intended to be used with a parent application, such as Photoshop.)

These Guys Were Not Clients

WHEN I WAS STILL at Otto, but I wish they had been.

Pix: 2016_02_16

zentangle_1

Rattling the Tin Cup

THE GO FUND ME campaign is still on all donations eagerly solicited and gratefully accepted.

You can get to where you can donate (by PayPal, if that’s how you roll) by clicking the button at right.

Or, you can buy one of my books (at Amazon, of course), and get something tangible for your money. Trust me, you’ll enjoy them.

And I should say some good words about the kind and generous people who have gotten us this far. Thank you SO MUCH.

The Cloud Observatory: Observation 003

obs_003_160215

Ellipses for Monday, February 15, 2016

SORRY TO BE SO late posting today. I bet there is SOMEbody who’s been waiting on eleventerhooks for me, muttering in their beer that I’m behind schedule. I usually set the posts to appear around a quarter to seven. This morning, I had to shovel the walk. We had about six inches of global warming overnight.* I was up at that ungodly hour, but my attention was elsewhere.

YOU JUST CAN’T WIN DEPARTMENT

OBAMA DOES SOMETHING DECENT for a change and gets undercut by his fellow Democrats.

YOU CAN’T BREAK EVEN

YOU CAN’T EVEN GET OUT OF THE GAME

Nino Scalia managed to though. You’ve seen the stories. And the conspiracy theories abound. Obama had him assassinated a la Pelican Brief. (The author in me is pissed that people refer to the movie starring Denzel Washington and Julia Roberts and not the most excellent novel by John Grisham on which the movie is based. I recall that even the Reader’s Digest version was a tense, thrilling page-turner.) (And, no I’m not retailing the rumor, only reporting its pathetic existence.)

Are we, just as men like to imagine we’re hard wired to stare at women’s boobs…

Yay! Boobs!

Yes, Dolly we like to stare at YOUR boobs especially, but I was going somewhere: Are we hard-wired to fill in the empty frames of reality with our own, fevered imaginings? And are we hard-wired to go straight to the conspiracy thing? Occam’s Razor says we must be, and it also says we’re almost always wrong.

*That joke is so old that, before the global warming craze started up, it was “six inches of partly cloudy.” Referring, of course, to the inability of weatherfolk to predict even something so relatively simple as the amount of precipitation from a storm. And, of course, the dirty little secret is that the warmistas’ computer models don’t take into account the water vapor in the atmosphere — which has a whole order of magnitude greater effect on the heat content of the whole lashup than CO2 or even methane. The dirty little secret is that water vapor — clouds, humidity — is the biggest greenhouse gas and the warmists don’t even take it into account.

Pix_16_02_15

zentangle_2

My first attempt at pro-level doodling. I see all those photos of Moleskine pages on Pinterest with their beautifully-composed, and oh-so-clever doodles and I wonder at my temerity to even try.

A Sunday Funny

Follow Mark Philip Alger’s board Jazzcat on Pinterest.

Back in my 20s — in the late’70s — I did a fair stick of line drawing with a pencil, and inking with felt-tipped pens. This was before I was making a living at commercial art and had my own set of rapidographs, which I do, now — ultrasonic cleaner and ever’thinn.

Above is a Pinterest board carrying the individual panels of a strip I did. The title of the strip is Jazzcat. It’s about — surprisingly — a cat who loves jazz. She has (from her perspective) the misfortune of belonging to a heavy metal rock guitarist, whom she calls Axe Murderer.

I lost interest in the project because I realized (then) that I didn’t have a notion of how to continue to develop scripts. How do I follow this template and make regular period witticisms on the themes stated in these three strips? Now, I think I could plot it, if I could draw it. And there’s the rub — drawing the thing. Even here, between panels 1 and 2 of Strip2, you can see the inconsistency in Jazz’s face. Readers might not be bothered by it, but it would bug the fuck out of me.

And that’s why I need to work on my drawing chops.

Ellipses for Saturday, February 13, 2016

MISSED FRIDAY THE 13th by one.

::CRUDE, BUT EFFECTIVE …

WP_20160212_17_20_02_ProPART OF THE ACTIVITY ongoing currently in The Study at Casa d’Alger is cleaning and re-arranging work areas. Toni has on her plate at the moment the decoration and framing of prints to be auctioned off to benefit Dick Wagner’s Remember the Child benefit in aid of (If I have this right) St. Jude hospitals for children. I could be wrong about that. In order to clear space on her desk for that — and to make room for the birdcage — she’s been beavering away at shredding outdated records, clearing out junk, taking donables to Goodwill, sellables to Half Price Books, and so-forth.

WP_20160212_17_20_15_ProI, on the other hand, am maneuvering to get rid of the jury-rigged desk (a sheet of MDF lain across plastic milk crate file thingies on 4-wheel furniture dollies) which I have been using for … I guess four years, now. I will be returning to status quo ante-ante-ante and using the powder-coated-wire baker’s rack I was using in the late ’90s and around the turn of the century. (That makes it sound so long ago.)

Friday, I cleaned out some junk lumber (crap — scorn quotes — “hardwood” ply imported from China and sold five-to-seven years ago by both Home Despot and the Lowes Matrix … but no more, thank the Gods of the Copybook Headings) from the corner under the printer, (where, eventually, some bookshelves will be set on file cabinets, drawer units, and glass-doored bookshelves), and set up a Workmate with a piece of 1/2″ ply (that Chinese crap) on top for a drawing surface.

And that’s the (buried) lede. I now have a drawing table. A place to work on my chops. Coupled with my scanner, I should be able to move toward making better covers for my books, which is what all this is in aid of.

::NOT EVEN SURE WHY …

THIS IS controversial.

PINTEREST NOW ACTIVATED …

YOU MAY HAVE NOTICED that, when you hover your mouse cursor over an image on BTB, a small, 3D button with the label Pin It appears in the upper left corner. This is a Pinterest button. If you have a Pinterest account, clicking on that button will pop up a window offering you the option to pin that image to a board in your profile. If you don’t, I don’t know about you. You really should. Pinterest is a most excellent time sink, and a subject of much fascination at this desk.

If you just want to visit our profile — and who wouldn’t — the objects of our fascination can be seen at https://www.pinterest.com/markphilipalger/ pinterest dot com slash mark philip alger (All one word — one “l” in philip.). Lots of neat and fascinating stuff on 69 subjects.

:: ICYMI (Which is, in case you missed it, is …

INTERNET-SPEAK FOR In Case You Missed It): Law Dog is back, and in true form.

Coffee spew alert.

:: IN AN ASIDE, THE DUTCHMAN …

MUTTERS So useful to the enemy that if he did not exist, they’d want to invent him. (And links to this article.)

Well, Mike…

statism ideas so goodI’d have to say… Recalling back from the ’60s, when it was asserted that, in any revolutionary cell of four, three were FBI agents, that agents provocateur, being tools of statism (ideas so great they have to be mandatory), are inevitable. So inevitable, I say, that any fool so foolish as to appear to be too bad to be true ought to be considered to be one (agent provocateur, I mean).

:: KEVIN ASKS

“WTF?!? WHEN DID that get regulated? (The amount of ammunition an American may possess.)

Oh, c’mon, Kev! You know that. It’s part of the rich legacy of British common law we inherited back when we were just 13 poor little colonies, shivering on the East Coast of this vast land (Where nobody ever owned firearms, because — after all — who needed them? The redcoats were around to protect us. (And after all, they were the greatest army in the world in their day.))

You remember: Paul Revere’s ride, when the redcoats marched out of Boston to Lexington and Concord, and seized all that ammunition and powder (they didn’t have manufactured cartridge ammunition back then, only ball and powder) on behalf of the Crown. (You know — King George III.)

The Caturday Post, February 13

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Loki — Because (I assume) he is a light-eyed cat, he hates the flash more than ordinarily. And he seems to be able to tell when a camera is set to use one, whether by seeing the autofocus laser or by hearing the flash’s capacitor charging. When he does, he closes his eyes. Which solves the redeye problem. It took me about a year using the Coolpix to learn to shoot him in good light so the flash was not necessary. This situation is improved even more since I started using the Lumia for more-to-most of my cat shots, because of its brilliant use of existing light.

(Marginally related anecdote: my teacher at the Nikon School used to say that “available light” is a nonsense term. As he put it, if you have a flash in your pocket, that’s available. And “natural” light forecloses situations indoors when there is only artificial light. He preferred (and passed that preference to me) to say, “Existing light.” Meaning that the photographer is not intending to change the light, no matter its source, or how it falls, taking it as he finds it and making the best image possible given that.)

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The Cloud Observatory: Observation 002

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Ellipses for Friday, February 12, 2016

OF NECESSITY, I HAVE been lately investigating money-making (earning) opportunities.

Although I am not looking for a “get rich quick” scheme, I do not believe that there is any future in what used to be called “gainful” employement — i.e. jobs — at least not for people as close to retirement age as I am. Instead, I am convinced that, closer to the truth, in the future, we will all be — to one degree or another — cottage industrialists. That an ever-growing portion of the labor force will find their employment in hustling small-bore enterprise. Singular avocational specialization will no longer be possible, as personal support will not admit of being realized in one sole occupation.

I have, therefor, been exploring such atomized pursuits as may match up with my particular skills set. One such has been iWriter. And here is my recommendation on that particular one.

They are at some pains to set themselves up so as to not be an employer — paying wages and benefits and having to pay the higher rate of taxes and unemployment insurance, and cover withholding of income taxes. Instead, they have attempted to set themselves up as a broker — pairing writers and consumers of text for a fee, but not exactly employing or being employed. At the same time, they seek to play the employer by demanding that all work they broker be “work for hire,” which means THEY own the copyrights.

Oh, HELLS to the no. Not taking that one up the old wazoo. Nor would I recommend any other writer do so.

ON A SIMILAR, if opposite score, I can cheerfully recommend one source of information, an online publication titled The Penny Hoarder. The blogger here not only finds and directs the reader to potential sources of income, but does the same for money SAVING offers. Worth your while.

DSCN8394OLD FRIEND RAGIN’ DAVE points out that it’s cold outside. (With help from some singers.) We here at Casa d’Alger have made the same observation. The Gales of November may have sunk the Edmund Fitzgerald, but February is always the bitch of winter around here. I’ve also noticed that, nearly any time we have an ice storm in February here in the Oh-hee-ho Valley, one looks back and wonders, “Gee. And it was 60 just last week, too!”

Shot at right is from Bellevue, Kentucky, on the south shore of the Ohio, back in 2007. (Click to embiggen.)

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An assertion of Chaotica.

Ellipses for Thursday, February 11, 2016

SOME YEARS AGO, I MADE IT a regular practice to run a single column of short notes, delimited by ellipses (…) for my daily blog substance. For the nonce, as I attempt to re-instantiate BTB —

— Whatchoo mean “I”, paleface?

Your pardon, Dolly. …as WE attempt to re-instantiate BTB, Da Doll and I together, WE shall continue to do so.

Democrats rigging elections? Who’d ha’ thunk it?

Ace posts the fable of the boy and the nuts:

A boy put his hand into a jar of filberts and grasped as many as his fist could possibly hold. But when he tried to pull it out again, he found he couldn’t do so, for the neck of the jar was too small to allow of the passage of so large a handful. Unwilling to lose his nuts but unable to withdraw his hand, he burst into tears.

A bystander, who saw where the trouble lay, said to him,

“Come, my boy, don’t be so greedy. Be content with half the amount, and you’ll be able to get your hand out without difficulty.”

Alternative solutions (as opposed to being satisfied with half (so to speak) a loaf: 1) pick up the jar and pour the contents out — getting as much as (or more than) one’s hand can hold; 2) break the jar, thus getting the entire contents of it.

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

The Leftists’ Utopian Eden is a false paradise built on lies and maintained by abuses.– Sultan Knish

(Hat tip: American Digest.)

More tomorrow…

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Playing with Apophysis.

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Cloud Observatory: Observation 001

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It. Is. Up!

cvr genesis 0116DID IT! The Genesis Undertaking is uploaded to Amazon, enrolled in KDP Select and (I presume) KOLL. Registered copyright at US Copyright office. watch this space for the announcement that the eBook is live at Amazon. I encourage Dolly fans to post reviews at Amazon or GoodReads.

Kevin Brings Home a Short One

BACK IN THE GOODOLE DAYS — the golden age of blogging, I used to tease Kevin Baker of The Smallest Minority for his runon posts. Lawd, the boy could write one! They were long! But when he wrote it, there wasn’t any more to be writ about it.

Me, I’m kindof a short-and-sweet guy. I’m always looking for the succinct bon mot, le mot juste — just the word that perfectly describes a situation or sums up a concept. But only one and one only.

So, along with my gratitude for his kindness, imagine my pleasure at reading this post at TSM.

Short. And. Suh-weet!

In a New Line of Business

SO OF COURSE being made redundant at the old gig is saddening and all that, but still and all, it frees up time and energy for creative pursuits not chasing somebody else’s dime. And having 35 years of experience at something, even if it’s not what they wanted you to have experience at does tend to indicate that you might be good — or even passable — at it… maybe even good enough to get paid to do it.

The bottom line is, once we get all sorted out, we’re going to be hanging out a shingle with “Will Desine fer Food” on it. So, as you go through life, when you encounter design work that may be done by a freelancer, do be so good as to keep us in mind. I can assure prospective customers of this: given clear parameters, I will quote a price up front, I will honor that price so long as the job remains unchanged, and my rates will start out cheap — by comparison with the market.

If you anticipate a need, bookmark this link: Dreamflower Works, which is my company name (dba only, not yet incorporated or LLC’d). As time allows, there will be a portfolio of sorts up there. For now, you can see my work in the gallery pages on Otto’s site. For as long as they allow that.