Monthly Archives: March 2018

But, of course…

AND WHAT DO WE DO ABOUT IT? Why, de-platform them. If, as we believe, the liberty position is the majority position, it should be simplicity itself to take down the tech Goliaths with Glenn Reynolds’s Army of Davids principle.

But we should not surrender before we’re begun by using the same whingeing pose the Left uses. We do not call their actions anti-conservative, but anti-liberty, anti-freedom, pro-slavery. Hashtag the pissants. #AntiLiberty.

Idea Endorsed

I THOUGHT BACK IN Ought-Nine that the Tea Party was going to be the replacement for the Republican Party, just as the GOP, when it was new, was a replacement for the Whigs. That didn’t happen. Because the Republican Party tried to strangle the newborn Heracles in the cradle. That betrayal should be marked down as the instant that the New Republican Party began. The Tea Party patriots have wormed their way into the guts of the Right, just the way that the communists have infiltrated the Left.

Writing at Conservative Review, Daniel Horowitz proposes the next — I should say, the next logical — step. RTWT.

I like the idea. So should you.

Photo Safari Sunday

CAME ON WEDNESDAY this week. Because Toni and I spent Sunday working around the house — mostly to do with taxes — butt in chair, pen in hand, working the numbers. Running them upon occasion, but really, just adding up long columns of figures and writing the total on a sheet of paper.

Wednesday, we went to the accountant (whom we’ve used since the early ’80s) and presented him with the fruits of our labor, for him to organize into a coherent statement of our incomes and deductions and figure out how little we can get away with paying the gooberment this year.

No point in talking specifics here, as everybody goes through some version of the same dance. Last December, I had a passenger who was also a Lyft driver who talked to me, asking how I handled taxes and stuff. I told him how I track income and expenses.

Of course, this is my first year doing this, so I’m going to have to tweak my system so that, at the end of the calendar year, it disgorges the correct set of numbers with no combing through the whole mess to winkle out the what of the that.

At the end of the session, while we were getting our coats on, the accountant asked where were planning to go to breakfast. I averred that it was our intention to head to the Perkins in North College Hill (about two miles away from his office). He recommended a place north of his office about three miles called The Sweetheart Cafe — a little hole-in-the-wall, patronized mostly by locals, tucked up in the corner of a strip mall behind a Hobby Lobby just past Northgate Mall going out Colerain Avenue.

He started listing all the goodies he enjoyed there, and Toni latched onto the idea right away. I had been looking forward to eggs Benedict at Perkins, so was a little reluctant, but was persuaded. I looked the address up in Waze and figured out that I knew just about where the place was, so we went there. And were glad. If you happen to be looking for breakfast in the rough area of College Hill-Mt Airy-Groesbeck-White Oak-Northgate-Springdale-Bevis neighborhoods in Cincinnati, you could do a lot worse. Though it’s probably 25 miles from home, we plan to return when we can.

Anyway, after we ate, we turned the nose of the car toward Toni’s goal of the day: Elmwood Place-Ivorydale-St Bernard.

She’d spotted an area of interest from the expressway and had described it to me as best she could and said she couldn’t figure out how to get there. I knew what she meant and had been wanting to go there myself; I was able to cobble together a way to get close and headed off that way. We snufffled around a bit in Hartwell and Carthage — around the Hamilton County Fairgrounds and some No Trespassing areas near National Distillery, then dove down into Elmwood. Toni would call out sights she found interesting, and I navigated the blocks to find them and shoot them — old churches, neat houses, ghost signs, industrial sites that promised our favorite textures of rust, stairstepped bricks, peeling paint, and spalled concrete. And doors. I go for architectural detail; Toni goes for doors and windows and ghost signs.

Some arc-det (ARChitectural-DETail) from a storefront on Vine Street in Elmwood:

We tooled around Elmwood Place a bit, circling blocks, stopping in front of interesting buildings — puzzling the natives — Toni leaning out her side of the car with her cell phone (she’s gotten damned good with that thing, for all she’s only reluctantly accomodating to the Samsung camera), I sticking a long lens out the driver’s side window. We even got out once to shoot a ghost sign on the side of an old drug store (I think). The frustating and fascinating thing about ghost signs is figuring out what they originally said. This one, in particular is possibly a palimpsest and badly faded. As is evident by this snap. (Click to embiggen.)

The door pic at top was taken late in our ramble, in Walnut Hills, on the edge of Avondale, near the old Reading Road Sears store and the old Ford Factory (now an out-clinic for Children’s Hospital). We were looking for a way to get to the old bakery on the former Melish Avenue (which was subsumed into Martin Luther King, Jr. drive (a.k.a. Em-El-Kay)). We got there, eventually, but hadn’t yet, when I turned a corner off Stanton and we found ourselves in a lower parking lot to the Children’s location, hard by I-71 and the MLK Drive exit northbound. It became clear that the parking lot was private property, so I turned around and headed out, when Toni shouted, “Stop!” and leaned out her window. I pulled up to the curb by a loading dock and there was this beautiful old sliding firedoor, with intact traveler hardware in a painted brick wall. She shot it and I leaned across the car and shot it, too.

The neat thing I noticed right away, in the flash preview, was that the shadow from the overhang formed a gradient, dark to light down the door and wall to the bright steel edge of the dock. So, even in gray, flat light on a snowy day, it’s possible to get interesting, beautiful light — no matter how subtle.

Comment to Your

HEART’S CONTENT or comment your heart’s content, whatever. For the past however, in an apparently misguided attempt to keep things “current” (whatever that is), comments on an individual post would close after two weeks. I have turned that off and comments will — or should — be open indefinitely. I’m sure this is going to mean more work for me, moderating and so forth, but I think it will be worth it, if it makes the blog more welcoming.

Alger says, “Thank you.”

For new and returning Trollistas, Da Doll (“Ç’est moi,” she says with a coquettish moue), has this primer. The comment system works like this: The first time you comment, your comment will be held in moderation. Once a moderator (moi, again –Doll) approves your comment, you, as a comment author, have one approved comment and can comment without moderation for the foreseeable future.

Several incarnations of this blog ago, we had a membership system. It fell by the wayside amongst our changes of hosts and blogging platforms — a period we refer to as “Our Time in the Wilderness.” Now that we are settled here on WordPress at DreamHost, Alger and I have been kicking around the idea of reinstating that fine institution. (Membership, that is.) But first, we need to figure out what benefits that would confer, and second, we need to find a pret-a-porter system to instantiate it. When we do, you’ll be the first to learn about it. But Da Doll is pretty sure it will start with some kind of registration to comment — which is why it’s germane to the subject at hand.

Blogging All Along

OF COURSE, THE IRONY IS that I have been — blogging all along, that is — and I have the stats to prove it. (Speaking of which, I need a privacy-respecting alternative to Google Analytics.)

Last night, I started a comment thread on Facebook and commented on Instapundit. I’ve put out tentative feelers on this topic before, but, as a friend of Prof. Reynolds put it, “With all this privacy crap about Facebook rearing its ugly head, I’m thinking about returning to blogging.”

I would seriously like substantive answers. I have over 1200 Friends on Facebook. Please do me the favor of responding. If I were to leave Facebook and “go back to the blog,” as Prof Reynolds put it. Would many — or any — of you come along with and participate at BabyTrollBlog?

Responses have been neutral-to-negative on balance. Which illustrates the market penetration incumbent socmed (SOCial MEDia) have versus blogs. Most readers find the incumbents more convenient than blogs. Apparently, the privacy crap doesn’t outweigh the convenience. Which, I suppose is the same conundrum leftists face when they think people should be willing to pay a higher price for goods that appear to address some concerns of social justice for that reason alone, but they aren’t; they go for the low-price item every time. That’s how markets work.

We in the blogosphere better hope that the perceived cost of socmed’s assaults on privacy outweighs the perceived inconvenience of patronizing blogs. Otherwise, it’s a lot of effort for little return.

Our Friend Cedar

SANDERSON has a new post up on the subject of broken windows policing. You know, the way Rudy Giuliani is credited with cleaning up New York. The neat part is that she chose some of Alger’s photography to illustrate it. Guess who’s chuffed.